ENERGY EXPERTISE

21
Dec

Exploring a new energy market model

Towards a sustainable energy ecosystem with the Layered Energy System

Our energy market model has been set up top-down and centralistic, from production (via transmission and distribution) to consumption. But our current model is no longer fit-for-purpose. For example the model is not suitable for end-users with solar panels that generate a surplus of energy and feed it back into the energy network (bottom-up). This leads to questions that urgently need to be answered.

A very important question regarding a (new) sustainable energy ecosystem is: what should be the role of local energy communities in our energy system? Distributed generation and flexibility are part of the cause as well as the solution of the challenges the energy system faces. Demand-response by aggregators is currently not very attractive for the owners of flexibility (the end-user) nor is it a scalable solution in the long run. At the same time, local communities of end-users are founded and are experimenting with energy sharing, flexibility and with distributed network technologies (like blockchain). We believe that this system-averse social trend is an important factor in the energy transition.


In close co-operation with the Dutch distribution grid operator Stedin, Energy21 developed the Layered Energy System (LES). In an earlier phase we explored the concept of local energy communities and local markets [link]. Now, we have described more detailed the mechanics and roles of stakeholders in a Layered Energy System. We believe that the concept of LES provides a feasible elaboration of the “Citizens Energy Community” as mentioned in the EU Clean energy package [link].


LES offers insights and possible solutions to stakeholders’ issues moving towards a sustainable energy ecosystem. Energy21 is proud to present the LES Whitepaper and continues to discuss the topic with all stakeholders in the energy ecosystem.

Download

Interested to get in contact?

For more information, please contact Michiel Dorresteijn (Projectlead Market Analysis & Blockchain Technology)
via +31 6 117 169 27 or mail michiel.dorresteijn@energy21.com

3
Dec

Finalist of The Challenge Engineering 2018

In The Challenge Engineering 2018, our colleague Alex Trijselaar, Product Manager, presented Energy21’s industrial solution as the best innovative solution to fight climate change.

After an exciting selection procedure, Alex was nominated as one of the final three to present the best solution for the climate case originated by KIVI. He presented Energy21’s industrial solution that focuses on digitalizing the energy processes of larger industrial sites.

Alex commented: “It was an honor to present our solution in the finals to a professional jury and an audience with Marjan van Loon representing Shell to create more awareness around this topic. This is an often overlooked solution, while some parties started implementation as early as 2015 and the results are very promising.”

Diederik Samsom, one of the jury members, said: “For sure the best contributor to CO2 reduction if you will work with the big twelve in Dutch industry.”

You can review his introduction here, or review the final pitch on Youtube (in Dutch).


Would you like to hear more?

Contact Thomas Crabtree via thomas.crabtree@energy21.com or +31 6 3085 2747 to discuss your planning challenges. Also, read more about how we can deliver, manage and optimise your energy processes using our software solution EBASE. Or take a deeper dive into other energy optimisation strategies for industrial energy users:

EBASE Solution Strategies
9
Sep

Utility planning for industrial energy users

The concept of industrial symbiosis is that various industrial processes benefit from each other’s presence. Key in being able to make waste streams useful is a clever utility planning. Or as we like to state: waste + plan = feedstock.

Industrial symbiosis saves raw materials and energy, minimizes emissions, cuts logistics costs and exploits synergies. The concept can be applied to multiple sites being connected, as well as having dependencies in internal processes.  An interesting example of this concept is the “Verbund” mindset of our client BASF.

 

Utility planning as a driver for industrial symbiosis

On complex industrial sites the primary production processes and energy & utilities processes are strongly interconnected. Most obviously, the demand for energy and utilities is dependent on the intensity of the production process.

An accurate translation of production planning to energy and utilities demand is therefore key to avoiding excess energy generation. Where excess electricity can be fed into the national grid, excess steam and utilities are often wasted (check this infographic on creating value of excess steam).

There are several ways of improving your energy and utility planning.

Assuming the translation of production plans to energy demand is accurate, the starting point is to create insight in the accuracy of the demand plans of individual plants.
Creating awareness of these numbers will often lead to a natural improvement in accuracy.
Next, ex-post analysis of plan data versus actual demand can indicate structural deviations, which can be accounted for in the planning process.
Finally and when applicable, you can use advanced algorithms to create demand forecasts based on weather data and other relevant parameters.

 

How your utility planning is affected by heat and waste streams

If your operation contains exothermic processes and/or useful waste streams, utility planning becomes more interesting and complex. You can feed waste heat of exothermic processes back into the steam network, while combusting waste streams in boilers to generate ‘free’ steam.

If production plans fluctuate heavily over time, so will waste streams and energy demand. Key in these situations is to smartly combine all relevant parameters to reach the most optimal planning. One example is to schedule maintenance activities in periods when less waste streams are expected, in an attempt to match a reduced flow of free steam with reduced demand.

 

 


We can help you to improve your utility planning!

Contact Thomas Crabtree via thomas.crabtree@energy21.com or +31 6 3085 2747 to discuss your planning challenges. Also, read more about how we can deliver, manage and optimise your energy processes using our software solution EBASE. Or take a deeper dive into other energy optimisation strategies for industrial energy users:

EBASE Solution Strategies
9
Oct

Webinar: Where and how to execute optimization strategies?

Providing practical knowledge to industrial energy users on the how of energy optimization

Built upon the use case of the planning optimization of a steam boiler (which can be illustrative for other energy generating asset), we share various examples of applying strategies that are both ambitious and feasible to execute without additional investments in energy related assets.

 

Register for the webinar

 

See below a preview of the examples discussed.

 

The importance of structuring data according to your site topology

The speakers kick off with looking into the data organization for a fictional production site with 2 steam boilers. This example showes the relationship between organizing your data on site topology and a succesful connection of your internal to your external planning.

 

 

 

 

 

How to determine the size & location of your optimization potential?

As of 9.00 min, two new examples are introduced on asset planning. These two examples explain step-by-step how increased accuracy in demand planning and imbalance forecast result in an optimized asset planning.

 

 

 

Operationalize in order to monetize

Fast forward to 20.00 min to learn about the relevance of using pre-defined scenarios in order to realize your optimization potential. The speakers explain the above by looking at a fictional situation in which the spot prices for the next day cross a threshold.

 

 

 

 

In this webinar, you will:

 Learn about the data pre-conditions for locating optimisation potential?
 Understand how to determine the location, size and availability of your optimisation potential
 Learn how to use pre-defined scenarios to offset your optimisation against their costs / your production targets

 Learn how to enable your operational staff to act in line with your strategy
 Understand how to continuously improve your production & (multi-utility) energy planning

 

Go to webinar


Or read our Guide for Commercial & Industrial Energy users explaining the key parameters for a efficient & optimized energy operation step by step.

 

Guide